How to Brew Turkish Coffee at Home?

Need a change to your morning cup? Try an aromatic cup of Turkish coffee at home. If mornings are synonymous with coffee and a cup is the first thing you look forward to before starting your day then consider experimenting with your palette. It’s different from classic cappuccino and gives a strong espresso a run for its money. A cup of Turkish coffee carries a lot of heritage. There are many fans of Turkish coffee in Dubai, so it could be an instant hit for your next coffee date.

How Is Turkish Coffee Different From Espresso

Before you dive into a cup it is important to know how Turkish coffee is different from espresso. Both an espresso and Turkish coffee tantalize the senses and offer you a strong and rich flavour. The two are separate brewing methods and not different beans. The selection of the coffee beans should come down to your own personal taste and preferences. These types of coffee are usually consumed without milk or creamer.

The difference in the brewing method consists of the number of pieces a single bean is ground into. Commonly for an espresso, a single bean is ground into 3,000 particles. Whereas in Turkish coffee, the number can reach up to 45,000 particles.

Turkish Coffee Beans, Turkish Coffee Color

History About Espresso & Turkish Coffee

The espresso came about in 1884 and the first machine was patented by Angelo Moriondo during the industrial revolution. Not surprisingly the process involved squeezing the flavor from the coffee bean using the pressure of steam. Originating in Italy, the process found its way to the United States in 1927 in New York.

Turkish coffee, on the other hand, was introduced by the Turkish Governor of Yemen- Ozdemir Pasha around 1540. The drink was introduced to the Sultan and soon new methods of brewing came to light. Soon coffee professionals known as ‘Kahveci Usta’ would prepare the drink. The key difference is that Turkish Coffee is simmered just under boiling point, whereas espresso uses steam by exerting pressure.

 Brew Turkish Coffee At Home

How to Brew Turkish Coffee at Home in a Pot?

As the name suggests the brew carries not only a unique flavor but a rich culture that steeps itself into the brewing process.

  • To start with you will need cold filtered water, your desired Turkish coffee beans and sugar along with a pot with a wide bottom. This is usually made from copper and is known as a ‘cezve’ in Turkey, meant for brewing coffee. You may also use an ‘ibrik’ which is a pitcher/ewer and not a designated coffee pot.
  • Measure 1 ½ cup of water using the cup you intend on serving the coffee in for each cup.
  • Next add sugar to the water, do not wait to add sugar towards the end.
  • After adding water and sugar to your cezve place it on the stove on a medium-high flame until the water heats up, this should take about 3-4 minutes.
  • Now you are ready to add one tablespoon of coffee grounds per 3 ounces of water. Experiment with the levels a bit to match your preference.
  • The coffee grounds will begin to float to the top, do not stir them. This is the dark foam that Turkish coffee is famous for.
  • As the coffee begins to boil pour half the coffee into the cups
  • Allow the remainder of the brew to simmer for about 20-30 seconds before filling up the cups

The dark foam is important and is considered customary that it is served along with the coffee. The foamier your coffee the better it will taste. To drive the point home, another age old saying goes “Sleep cannot be without blanket, coffee without foam”. Knowing about the traditions and culture can make your experience much more enjoyable.

The Culture Around Turkish Coffee

Turkish coffee found footing in fortune-telling (the academic name term is ‘Tassography’. It is also an integral component in daily rituals with friends and family. A part of the custom was that the youngest girl in the family makes the coffee. She then serves it first to the eldest member present. Turkish coffee traditionally came to the table when a groom-to-be came to visit the bride’s home. If the bride made the coffee with salt instead of sugar it served as an indicator that she did not want to marry. However, if the man finished the cup silently without complaint it implied, he possessed sound character and was ready to marry. On the flip side, the groom could reject a bride if she possessed poor coffee brewing skills.

Turkish Coffee found its place in the art of fortune telling and the academic name of the practice goes by Tassography. It stands as an integral component in daily rituals with friends and family. A part of the custom was that the youngest girl in the family makes the coffee. She then serves it first to the eldest member present. Turkish coffee in the olden days was offered when the groom-to-be came to visit the bride’s home. If the bride made the coffee with salt instead of sugar it was seen as an indication that she did not want to be married. However, if the man finished the cup silently without complaint it implied, he was of sound character and was ready to be married. On the flip side, the groom could reject a bride if she possessed poor coffee brewing skills.

Is There A Simpler Way Without A ‘Cezve’ (Turkish Coffee Pot)?

Tempted to give Turkish coffee at home a chance? But still unsure about brewing it or simply do not have the time to oversee it simmer on a flame? You can purchase a Turkish coffee machine, this nifty appliance simplifies life and helps you experience the brew’s authentic taste. You can grab one with multiple features that helps you customize your coffee to you liking. Some alert you when your brew is ready. Owning a Turkish coffee machine ensures you enjoy excellent taste in a consistent manner.

You can buy a stylish and compact machine such as Beko’s single pot Turkish coffee machine or search for one that is more suited to your specific needs.

Turkish coffee machine

Treats to Serve Along

Whether you decide to enjoy a cup reading your favourite book or serve it along some Turkish delight. Or offer Baklava when your friends and family come over, you can’t go wrong with a pot of fresh brew. You can also serve Turkish Coffee alongside some danish, brownies, cake, cinnamon rolls, or cheese and fruit to add variety. The Turkish people usually do consume sweets with the brew. Ironically, Turkish coffee is not served during breakfast but rather once breakfast is complete or during the afternoon and evening times.

Combinations of sweet and savory are limited only by your imagination. Personally, I enjoy Turkish Coffee with nothing but a teaspoon of sugar and invite you to try the same!

Danesh Engineer
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